Anesthesia & Analgesia's supplement for education and dialog

Pierre Robin Sequence: a review for the anesthesiologist

Pierre Robin Sequence: a review for the anesthesiologist

One of the dreaded difficult airway disorders is Pierre Robin Sequence (PRS), also called Pierre Robin Syndrome. It is defined as a combination of cleft palate, micrognathia (small jaw), and glossoptosis (airway obstruction resulting from backward and downward displacement of the base of the tongue). The term “sequence” is often used because it is thought that a(…)

August 2014: Anesthesia & Analgesia

August 2014: Anesthesia & Analgesia

The August issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia has just posted. Dr. Steven Shafer, editor-in-chief, Anesthesia & Analgesia: Ding and colleagues (Epidural Labor Analgesia Is Associated with a Decreased Risk of Postpartum Depression: A Prospective Cohort Study) at Peking Union Medical Center found that epidural anesthesia decreased the risk of postpartum depression. In their accompanying editorial Wisner(…)

Wrong site surgery is a “never event”: examination using root cause analysis

Wrong site surgery is a “never event”: examination using root cause analysis

  As implied by the name, “Never Events” should never occur. Health care registries can capture such sentinel events, facilitating root cause analysis to help determine how to prevent their recurrence.  Dr. Sally Rampersad, Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seattle Children’s Hospital and University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington, and colleagues describe(…)

Root cause analysis after cardiac arrest due to local anesthetic overdose

Root cause analysis after cardiac arrest due to local anesthetic overdose

In the previous post, the authors described how Wake Up Safe (WUS) members use a standardized root cause analysis (RCA) method when adverse events occur in part to determine system changes that can be implemented to reduce future risk.  Dr. David Buck, Department of Anesthesiology, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, Cincinnati, Ohio, and Drs. Renee Kreeger and(…)

Wake Up Safe: an effort to improve quality and safety of anesthesia care provided to children across the US

Wake Up Safe: an effort to improve quality and safety of anesthesia care provided to children across the US

Health care registries used to track adverse events can provide an important service for the health care practitioner. Registry data can reveal causes and trends that can be used to educate others, particularly for rare events that are otherwise difficult to track. Dr. Imelda Tjia, Department of Pediatric Anesthesiology, Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, Texas, and(…)