Anesthesia & Analgesia's supplement for education and dialog

Double-lumen tube insertion success using three different double-lumen tubes

Double-lumen tube insertion success using three different double-lumen tubes

Double-lumen tube endotracheal tubes (DLT) are commonly used for thoracic surgery procedures. If patients are thought to pose an intubation challenge many anesthesiologists will first insert a single-lumen tube into the trachea. Once the airway is secured they place the DLT using a tube exchanger. The exchange is sometimes difficult. For example, if the tip(…)

Is postoperative opioid use after minor surgery related to PTSD?

Is postoperative opioid use after minor surgery related to PTSD?

Opioid use and posttraumatic stress disorder among veterans have been in the news. Is there a relationship between the two? For veterans who undergo elective ambulatory knee arthroscopy, is PTSD a risk factor for chronic postoperative pain, and are these veterans likely to use postoperative opioids for longer than 3 months? Dr. Irene Rozet, Department(…)

Pierre Robin Sequence: a review for the anesthesiologist

Pierre Robin Sequence: a review for the anesthesiologist

One of the dreaded difficult airway disorders is Pierre Robin Sequence (PRS), also called Pierre Robin Syndrome. It is defined as a combination of cleft palate, micrognathia (small jaw), and glossoptosis (airway obstruction resulting from backward and downward displacement of the base of the tongue). The term “sequence” is often used because it is thought that a(…)

August 2014: Anesthesia & Analgesia

August 2014: Anesthesia & Analgesia

The August issue of Anesthesia & Analgesia has just posted. Dr. Steven Shafer, editor-in-chief, Anesthesia & Analgesia: Ding and colleagues (Epidural Labor Analgesia Is Associated with a Decreased Risk of Postpartum Depression: A Prospective Cohort Study) at Peking Union Medical Center found that epidural anesthesia decreased the risk of postpartum depression. In their accompanying editorial Wisner(…)

Wrong site surgery is a “never event”: examination using root cause analysis

Wrong site surgery is a “never event”: examination using root cause analysis

  As implied by the name, “Never Events” should never occur. Health care registries can capture such sentinel events, facilitating root cause analysis to help determine how to prevent their recurrence.  Dr. Sally Rampersad, Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seattle Children’s Hospital and University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington, and colleagues describe(…)